Stray Signals

Throwback: Midland Amateur Radio Club

http://www.ourmidland.com/lifestyles/article/Thowback-Midland-Amateur-Radio-Club-11739710.php


Updated 8:05 am, Wednesday, August 16, 2017

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Clair Parker, president of the Midland Amateur Radio Club, observes Dr. Lynn Hooker as he makes a radio contact in the field day at Barstow Woods. June 1962

 

Clair Parker, president of the Midland Amateur Radio Club, observes Dr. Lynn Hooker as he makes a radio contact in the field day at Barstow Woods. June 1962

 


Photo: Daily News File Photo

Two life memberships to the Midland Amateur Radio Club were presented to C.E. Bud Price, left, of Hemlock, and Arthur Townsend Jr., center, of Midland. David Russell, director of the community center, presented the awards. April 1970

 

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Two life memberships to the Midland Amateur Radio Club were presented to C.E. Bud Price, left, of Hemlock, and Arthur Townsend Jr., center, of Midland. David Russell, director of the community center, presented

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Photo: Daily News File Photo

Midland Amateur Radio Club Field Day. Shown installing the antenna are, from left, Larry Adams, Monte Hatfield, Ronald Rees and Roger Trucks. June 1969

Midland Amateur Radio Club Field Day. Shown installing the antenna are, from left, Larry Adams, Monte Hatfield, Ronald Rees and Roger Trucks. June 1969


Photo: Daily News File Photo

Midland Amateur Radio club members, Gary Wyse, seated, Bill Fenn, left, and Kenneth Karle maintain a station at their Chippewa River cabin. June 1970

 

Midland Amateur Radio club members, Gary Wyse, seated, Bill Fenn, left, and Kenneth Karle maintain a station at their Chippewa River cabin. June 1970

 


Photo: Daily News File Photo

Fred Murch of the Midland Radio Club, was among club members who assisted the Midland Police Department in their Memorial Day traffic control operation. Mobile units of the radio club were in contact with police headquarters and squad cars in an effort to control the heavy holiday traffic. May 1955

 

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Fred Murch of the Midland Radio Club, was among club members who assisted the Midland Police Department in their Memorial Day traffic control operation. Mobile units of the radio club were in contact with

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Photo: Daily News File Photo

Stanley Yascolt, a rural Pinconning amateur radio operator, was able to talk to his son, Airman Second Class Stanley Yascolt Jr., in Greenland. July 1962

 

Stanley Yascolt, a rural Pinconning amateur radio operator, was able to talk to his son, Airman Second Class Stanley Yascolt Jr., in Greenland. July 1962

 


Photo: Daily News File Photo

Ham radio operators relayed messages to various parts of the state and nation. In the home of Fred Murch, chairman of the local Emergency Corps of the Midland Radio Club, are Municipal Judge Henry Hart, right and Murch, left. Hart and Mrs. Orren Bandeen originated the rely message and Murch was one of the broadcasters. October 1950

 

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Ham radio operators relayed messages to various parts of the state and nation. In the home of Fred Murch, chairman of the local Emergency Corps of the Midland Radio Club, are Municipal Judge Henry Hart, right

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Photo: Daily News File Photo

Midland Amateur Radio Club members were busy at the 21st annual Field Day at Barstow Field. W.E. Wallace, seated, and James Kessel check their radio equipment before they attempt to make contact with other stations all over the country. D.F. Christensen was in charge. June 1957

 

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Midland Amateur Radio Club members were busy at the 21st annual Field Day at Barstow Field. W.E. Wallace, seated, and James Kessel check their radio equipment before they attempt to make contact with other

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Photo: Daily News File Photo

Sharat Muthyala, 10, and M.B. Chenoweth, work together at a gathering of Midland Amateur Radio Club. July 1986

 

Sharat Muthyala, 10, and M.B. Chenoweth, work together at a gathering of Midland Amateur Radio Club. July 1986

 


Photo: Daily News File Photo

Raleigh Wert uses a “Handitalkie” in conjunction with an area booster to communicate via shortwave with fellow ham operators. July 1983

 

Raleigh Wert uses a “Handitalkie” in conjunction with an area booster to communicate via shortwave with fellow ham operators. July 1983

 


Photo: Daily News File Photo

Midlander Sharat Muthyala, 9, taps out a message in Morse code on the homemade device he used while studying for his ham radio novice license. April 1986

 

Midlander Sharat Muthyala, 9, taps out a message in Morse code on the homemade device he used while studying for his ham radio novice license. April 1986

 


Photo: Daily News File Photo

Larry Crook, seated, fifth grade teacher at Cook School and Adams School student Shara Muthyala, both certified ham radio operators, talk to people in far-off cities during a classroom demonstration. February 1987

 

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Larry Crook, seated, fifth grade teacher at Cook School and Adams School student Shara Muthyala, both certified ham radio operators, talk to people in far-off cities during a classroom demonstration. February

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Photo: Daily News File Photo

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Photo: Daily News File Photo

Amateur radio enthusiasts made about 100 contacts when they participated in the national contest The hams contacted other operators in 25 states and used the 80, 40, 20, 10 and six bands, which are the amateur bands generally used. From left, seated, C.E. Bud Price, W.M. Murch, Jack Keaner, K.C. McQuiston and Ray E. Lane; standing, Aaron Boroks, W.A. Stelzer, A.S. Townsend and paul Sheffield. June 1959

 

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Amateur radio enthusiasts made about 100 contacts when they participated in the national contest The hams contacted other operators in 25 states and used the 80, 40, 20, 10 and six bands, which are the amateur

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Photo: Daily News File Photo


(Ham radio enthusiasts from throughout Michigan are gathering Saturday, Aug. 12. at the Midland Salvation Army building as the Midland Amateur Radio Club holds its 43rd annual Hamfest and Computer Show. Doors open to the public at 8 a.m.)

Midland licensed amateur radio operators formed their club in about 1947.

In 1949, the radio club had 25 members, 16 of whom were licensed. Club president was C.E. Price. Club secretary was W. M. Murch.

The club participated in the national radio field day that year. The purpose of field day was to test the ability of radio hams to operate under emergency conditions.

Some interesting stories:

Ham radio operators in Midland were successful in October 1950 in contacting Washington, D.C., Flint and Saginaw Red Cross headquarters in an annual radio relay test. A message sent by Municipal Judge Henry Hart, director of Midland civilian defense, and Mrs. Orren Bandeen, president of the Midland chapter of the American Red Cross, was used for the test. The message went as follows: We feel fortunate to be able to avail ourselves of the services of the Emergency Corps of the American Radio Relay League in times of need. Interested in the results of this trial message.

The purpose of the radio relay system was to prepare Midland and other communities for a disaster in which all normal communications would be silenced.

The message was started at 9 a.m. on an October Saturday morning in 1950 in Midland in Red Cross headquarters on a walkie-talkie. The message was picked up by the Mobile Auto radio transmitter of Jack Keaner, who then relayed it to the home transmitter of Fred Murch. Murch then relayed the message to Paul Woodland, who transmitted the message on his radio to a Flint ham radio. The message was given to the Flint Red Cross, and a return message came back at 10:30 a.m.

Saginaw Red Cross also was sent a message by Murch and the message, “Your trial message received OK at 9:40 a.m. Very interested in this trial message.”

Mount Pleasant received the message from Murch via the Isabella County transmitter of William Maxwell. Maxwell put the message on the Red Cross teletype to Washington D.C.

Murch said the radio test was done on “emergency power, so that if the city power should ever be shut off, we could communicate with the outside.”

In July 1962, Stanley Yascolt, a rural Pinconning amateur radio operator, was able to talk to his son, Airman Second Class Stanley Yascolt Jr., in Greenland. Yascolt Jr. was fishing the airwaves one day over Sondrestrom Air Force Base station KG1FR (FR is for frozen rabbit.) He made contact with a ham in Monroe. The operator there patched the call through by telephone to his parent’s home where he talked to his surprised parents. The elder Yascolt, who did not have his own equipment operating at that time of the call, regularly beamed toward Greenland at 6 a.m. every day and believed it would only be a matter of time and right atmospheric conditions before contact was made.

In 1985, Midland residents with family members or friends in Mexico were worried after earthquakes devastated Mexico City. Through the efforts of ham radio operator Don Christensen, the family of Cynthia Ponzanelli was able to receive information that she and her family were safe. Christensen gave his handle to an intermediary contact operator in Dallas. From the intermediary, one of the many operators who volunteered their stations, the information was relayed to amateur operators in Mexico City. Around 11:30 p.m., a message came from Mexico City, with word that Ponzanelli and her family were safe.

Christensen said he also helped an Oregon person whose daughter had a friend from Midland who was in Mexico City. It only took five minutes for Christensen to get an answer with direct contact with someone in Mexico CIty.

Throughout the years, area hams took part in national emergency radio tests, helped local police with traffic, participated in tornado drills and participated in other efforts helping make contacts during national emergencies.

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