Stray Signals

Local amateur radio operators meet daily – on the air – Your Valley

Ham radio does not use the Internet or telecommunications infrastructure but, if available, can link through gateways extending communications worldwide by just using a simple handheld two-way radio or what non-hams may refer to as a walkie-talkie. Ham radio communications is always reliable and constant especially when Internet, cellular, and normal telecommunications are not available.”

Members of the local amateur radio community have overcome the social-separation issue imposed during the coronavirus by meeting using their radios.

For amateur radio operators, also known as “hams,” this is not a new activity since most active hams communicate daily with other hams locally, regionally, across oceans and even globally through the use of earth orbiting satellites — including the International Space Station.

What is new is that local ham radio groups such as the Queen Creek Amateur Radio Club and the Queen Creek Emergency Communications Group are now including checks on their members’ status during this pandemic event.

Hams refer to this as “health and welfare” checks, a common practice during any emergency event in which amateur radios operators provide communications support to public safety organizations. These hams informally check up on each other daily and also weekly during formally scheduled meetings referred to as on air “nets.”

The members of the local ham groups meet using a radio repeater located in San Tan Valley allowing them to share time together on a wide variety of topics, covering the East Valley region and beyond.

Ham radio does not use the Internet or telecommunications infrastructure but, if available, can link through gateways extending communications worldwide by just using a simple handheld two-way radio or what non-hams may refer to as a walkie-talkie. Ham radio communication is always reliable and constant especially when Internet, cellular and normal telecommunications are not available.

The weekly Queen Creek Emergency Group net usually includes some 15 to 20 participants who “check in” through a central network control operator and then take turns sharing information. “Check-ins” normally range from Glendale, Ahwatukee, Mesa, Apache Junction, Gilbert, Queen Creek, San Tan Valley, Casa Grande and Florence. Keep in mind, this same activity is happening all over the country by local ham radio groups daily. That is a lot of health and welfare checking going on.

Topics can be anything from “how are you coping” to relaying tips and hints, posing technical questions, commenting on a good book to read, TV show or movie to watch, trivia questions, sharing

Read the full article at https://www.yourvalley.net/queen-creek-independent/stories/local-amateur-radio-operators-meet-daily-on-the-air,160462. STRAY SIGNALS does not claim ownership of the article. The original author is responsible for the content of this post

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